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Maybe this is Redundant, SAD Lights anyone use them.

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    Maybe this is Redundant, SAD Lights anyone use them.

    I excited because I have a sad light coming in tomorrow, I am hoping it helps a bit with my depression, anybody else use these do they seem to work well.

    #2
    Hello Derek. Yes, I use one, and I believe it helps. Doesn't replace meds, but I notice the difference between sitting in front of it vs. not doing so over the course of a winter.

    Mine is old; knowing you'll have a nice new one makes me envious . Enjoy!

    There's more on the subject of SAD lights under the Seasonal Affective Disorder section, which you may find helpful.
    uni

    ~ it's always worth it ~

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      #3
      Hi Derek,
      I use a SAD lite too. Mine is called a Happy Lite!
      I agree with Uni in that it doesn't replace meds and/or therapy, but I do think it helps me.
      Good luck with yours - let us know what you think of it.
      Stormy

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        #4
        I have one. How does everyone use it for timing , placement etc?

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          #5
          Hi Lizzy,
          I don't really use mine properly - I'm too far away from it I think.
          I use it while I'm on the treadmill - it is about 3 ft away from it which I think doesn't provide the best benifit - but I have it on for 45 minutes.
          I think ideally you should be maybe 1 foot awayish......(awayish....new word!)
          Stormy

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            #6
            Right on, a chance to use a newly minted word!

            I keep my light about 2 1/2 feet awayish . It is an older lightbulb-tube type, and I have it propped up against the wall behind my laptop. I start with 10 minutes exposure in mid-October and have gradually worked up to 40 minutes at present. Probably I'll reach 50 minutes. Usually I don't do an hour, unless it's a particularly dreary winter.

            My sister went immediately to 30 minutes the first day and it made her nauseous. Everybody's body will react uniquely; no different than meds in that way. Unfortunately it's an inexact science at this point.
            uni

            ~ it's always worth it ~

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              #7
              Hi Derek - curious about what you think of your SAD light?
              Stormy

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                #8
                I have one and use it in the mornings while getting ready for work. I don't look at it but have it on in my general area so I can 'absorb' the light - probably about 20-30mins each day. I use it in the evenings some days if it's really dark, I'm feeling extra low, or I didn't get to use it much in the morning. We have long winters and I work in an office without a window 9-5 every weekday. I've been finding the light helpful. Even if it's all in my head I'm OK with that. Any benefit is still a benefit!

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                  #9
                  Hi Caron,

                  I have worked in both natural lit areas and under florescent light. The natural light was a huge improvement! I am presently looking for a new job and am keeping this light issue in mind... it does limit my options some, but I feel I need to do all I can to keep the deep depression at bay.

                  Have you ever brought your SAD light to work?

                  Take care,
                  Kaight

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                    #10
                    I have been using mine for several years and find it helps, especially in the winter.

                    I am trying tostop taking my olanzapine. It made me gain 10 lbs. Does anyone have the same side effect?
                    Last edited by Friskyphantom; June 15th, 2018, 07:26 AM.

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                      #11
                      Hi Friskyphantom and welcome to the forum.

                      Unfortunately Olanzapine is well not for causing weight gain. In fact some nickname the drug Olanzafat! Unfortunately the atypical antipsychotics all have that potential side effect, although some more than others.
                      AJ

                      Humans punish themselves endlessly
                      for not being what they believe they should be.
                      -Don Miguel Ruiz-

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                        #12
                        I use a SAD light. I find it isnít as effective as it used to be but still works. If I wasnít still fighting for mental health care after 12 years untreated it would probably be better...

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                          #13
                          I occasionally use one in the spring and fall when the day length is changing quickly. I have to be careful though, because I'm bipolar I. I only used it for two weeks this fall, no more than 15 minutes at a time first thing in the morning, but I'm actually wondering if that's what precipitated my mania in October.
                          Pressure makes diamonds....

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                            #14
                            I've had consistent positive effects from SAD lights over the years. But it pays to do your homework before using one. They are considered an alternative therapy and therefore not regulated by law the same as drugs, and they certainly aren't all created equal. Also, as Gossip mentioned, those with bipolar disorder need to pay close attention to the "dosage" in order to avoid a manic response. And if you have certain eye issues (I don't know which ones offhand) , stay away from SAD lights until you discuss it with your eye doctor. There are other considerations too, including skin sensitivities and certain medications. The link below has detailed info.

                            I bought a new light not long ago, and have experimented with the distance from eyes, angle, and length of exposure in order to tweak the "dosage". I'm satisfied I've found the right combination now. I began with 10 minutes and am up to 23, which seems about right. I had it too close for a while and the brightness bothered me, so I backed off a bit and it's fine. They need to be very bright in order to work.

                            A very few insurance plans may cover at least part of the cost of a light. I'm guessing you'd need a doctor's prescription.

                            For helping with depression, especially in the winter, SAD lights have a lot of research backing them up. I've found the website https://cet.org/ has lots of good information.
                            Last edited by uni; December 29th, 2018, 02:19 PM. Reason: figuring out how to add the link
                            uni

                            ~ it's always worth it ~

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                              #15
                              I have a Verilux that has 2 different spectrums. I can't say that either has helped me but I've heard positive things from a couple people.

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